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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our countries debt crisis and get our economy going again and create jobs. right now, all eyes are on the white house. our country does not need a victory lap, it needs leadership. it is time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they are really going to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [inaudible question] >> we have outlined very specific proposals that we passed in last year's budget and the budget before. we know what the venue is. what we do not know is what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [inaudible question] >> i am not going to get into the details. it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur. we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. [inaudible question] >> no, no, no. stop. i have to tell you, i am disappointed in where we are. i am disappointed in what has happened over the last couple weeks. with the
proposal. but that's just one part of the fiscal cliff debate. the other side of this, the massive spending cuts that have now educators ringing the alarm. they warn of increased class sizes, the elimination of after-school and summer school programs, libraries could close, all this as the u.s. tries to close an achievement gap. joining me now to continue our education nation conversation, world-renowned educator dr. steve perry, also host of tv one's "save my son." steve, it's great to have you here. the secretary of education, arne duncan, has said that 9 million students would be affected by the cuts including nearly 2 million that are already living in this country in poverty. when we talk about special education needs for the kids of our country, we're essentially about to take away resources from the students that need it most. however, we're not talking enough about that. >> one of the reasons why there's even a conversation about cuts is not so much because there's less money coming in, it's because of so much money going out. where we spend the most amount of money in education is
the likelihood they'll strike a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. mining giant rio tinto plans to reign in spending by $7 billion, but still promises to beef up iron ore output. uk banks bracing for possible new rules. and hitting the jackpot, the search is on for the lucky winners of the power ball lockry as two tickets matched all the the numbers. >>> look at the yields falling to 5.22 and 4.5% respectively. italy was town break the 4.5% mark earlier. euro-dollar is rebounding. dollar-yen also moving higher. aussie dollar was an underperformer. gold prices have stabilized. what did the volatile prices mean? we're joined by scott evans. scott, welcome. the extra ordinary move yesterday in gold wasn't so much the decline as the nature of it. we saw a sharp falloff in gold and other commodities. broadly speaking, volatility when it comes to the metals, is it an important part of the thesis for mining stocks? >> i think less so. it's more of a short to medium term call. it's much more to do on with a positive on rios, as well. if you look across the uk listed mining sectors, you come up with a reason
are calling president obama's offer to get off the fiscal cliff ludicrous and absurd. they are insisting on spending cuts. president held a campaign rally, toy factory in pennsylvania. she characterizing the opposition as a handful of republicans who want to hold middle class tax cuts hostage. what happens if a deal does not get done in time? we'll look at what sequestration really means. it appears susan rice had access to the president's daily brief before she made her misleading statement about the cause of the september 11 attacks. now back to my colleagues at "the five." ♪ ♪ >> brian: this is a senior and has autism and other development issues and a t place kicker, which is extraordinary. having a rough season. but anthony led the team to upset victory. here is how it sounded. [ cheering ] >> brian: this game-winning field goal is a hit on youtube ever since. what is amazing, this kid loves rutgers. he used to sit in the stands. developmentally around 12 years old. going to high school and beloved by everybody. sitting in the stands watching rutgers play and watched rutgers win
may hang in the balance as the nation gets closer to a fiscal cliff. democrats and republicans have one month to come up with a plan to stop the across the board tax hikes and the major federal spending cuts from taking effect. i'm gregg jarrett. >> heather: i'm heather childers. some of the early optimism for a deal seems to be fading. steve is live in washington with more. >> reporter: one month away from that so-called fiscal cliff. there appears to be very little movement toward any kind of deal. president obama is using the bully-pulpit to appeal to the american people to push for immediate action to push the tax cuts for everybody except for those earning more than $250,000 a year. in his saturday address, he stressed the urgency of the situation. >> if congress does nothing, every family will see their income taxes automatically go up at the beginning of next year. a typical middle-class family of four will see income taxes rise by $2200. we can't let that happen. a families can't afford it and neither can our economy. >> reporter: republicans led by house speaker john boehne
of about 9% across defense and all domestic spending. that is the fiscal cliff. we shouldn't be dealing with other issues that are long term in order to avert the cliff as it were. that is immediate crisis. we have long term situation --. bill: but you know when lawmakers get a little bit of rope, you know, when they get time to think about it and push it off to the next year, it never gets done. this budget proposal, there are many who wonder whether or not even democrats could support it. the last budget that came from the white house went to the senate, it went 98-0 against it. no one voted for it. melissa: well, that was kind of a tricky parliamentary issue as well but, i do take issue with one thing, the idea we haven't dealt with entightments. we had two years, a year and a half we debated medicare. we made significant changes in medicare. we just had a campaign which republicans including governor romney time after time after time charged that we had cut $616 billion in spending out of medicare and we reformed the program. we have looking toward new ways to compensate providers.
, and spending cuts that many believe would be a fiscal cliff that would kick in on january the 1st. chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel is watching it all unfold on capitol hill. what do we know about the visit about the expectations for what might happen during it. >> reporter: martha, timothy geithner arrived here on capitol hill a short time ago to meet first with senate majority leader harry reid. we know he's having individual meetings with the top four leaders of congress. what republicans have said they want to hear, and republicans will be critical, because they need republican support to get any final fiscal cliff deal through the senate, and also through the house, they say they hope that he's coming with concrete spending cut ideas that are acceptable to the administration. one of the meetings today will be with senate republican leader mitch mcconnell who a short time ago sounded pretty fired up. >> the only reason democrats are insisting on raising rates is because raising rates on the so-called rich is the holy grail of liberalism. their aim is not job he tkraoe a
>> chris: i'm chris walls wallace, 30 days and counting, until we go over the fiscal cliff. >> chris: the president is demanding higher tax rates. congressional republicans want deeper spending would you tell us and entitlement reform. will they make a deal before we bring in the new year with a round of tax increases for all of us? we'll ask the two men at the center of the negotiations, where we really stand. for the president, treasury secretary timothy geithner, for the g.o.p., house speaker john boehner. geithner and boehner, only, on fox news sunday. >>> plus we have seen this movie before. the two parties edging closer and closer to the brink. we'll ask our sunday panel whether we'll get a happy ending for an economic disaster. >>> and our power player of the week, a young beauty queen has to make a tough choice, all, right now on fox news sunday. ♪ >> chris: and, hello again from fox news in washington. well, we had quite a day around here, friday. with talks to avoid the fiscal cliff deadlock and everyone saying, the other side is to blame, treasury secretary
's economy goes over the so-called fiscal cliff. the white house and congressional republicans said to be deadlocked. president obama released his plan. it includes 1.6 trillion dollars in new tax increases. 50 billion in new stimulus spending. and stimulus, and new power to raise the debt ceiling without congressional approval. tim geithner, john boehner appearing with chris wallace on fox news sunday. >> we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to get this question resolved but the white house has responded with virtually nothing. they have actually asked for more revenue than they have been asking the whole entire time. >> in kind of a tough position now. it is going to be, obviously a little hard for them now. they're trying to figure out where they go next. we might need to give them a little more time to let them go next. we did what you expect from us. we laid out a very detailed, carefully designed set of spending savings and tax changes that help put us back on a path to fiscal responsibility. bill: where are we
who argue that we should go off the fiscal cliff, that it will push them to negotiate a sort of more thoughtful deal -- >> right. >> -- they say that it's not a fiscal cliff, it's, you know, more of a slope. having said that, what is your thought on the psychological impact if we go off the cliff? >> it's huge. it's tremendous. it's absolutely tremendous because it will go across the board from regular americans who are going to see their taxes go up from $500 to $2,000 for middle-income household. this is going to affect their bottom line tremendously. that's groceries. that's saving money. that's their savings money for the year. but also what about mortgage interest? will that affect the housing market? there may be initial -- basically, it will go back down again, the housing market. or if it gets phased in, maybe we'll see a jump because people will rush in before the deduction completely goes away. but i think there's a lot of concern and a lot of panic among regular americans about will i lose these tax deductions? and what's that going to do to the ability to pay all my bills
of the ceos in the room with president obama this week in the fiscal cliff meetings. many of the executives saying that the white house sounded resounding resoundingly reasonable when describing plans to address the debt and deficit. >> so was this proposal the white house made yesterday with more spending and very few spending cuts, was that what mr. sorenson was expecting out of the gate? he joins us on the telephone with his thoughts. good to have you with us. >> glad to be with you. >> when you were with the other ceos at the white house, does it jive with what we're hearing about that made mitch mcconnell laugh yesterday? are those two plans one in the same? >> well, i'm hopeful that what's happening in the media is posturing by both parties and doesn't reflect where either party thinks a deal will end up. i think what the president talked with us about on wednesday afternoon was much more a sense of where things ought to end up, and that was, i think, somewhat different than it sounds like what was proposed. >> so you didn't hear about the tax increase for the wealthiest, the spending
. you can't do that in three weeks. >> so do you think we go off the fiscal cliff? >> no. all you've got to do -- you know what you've got to do on the tax side. that's simple. you have to palass a law that ss the law has to be overwritten. >> and what would be your position on that? >> i think it's the simple thing to do. obviously do what the president is saying, you know. he ran a campaign on it. the legitimacy of that. if you've got to act in three weeks, you're not going to revise the income tax code in three weeks. it may be perfectly legitimate. i think that both. personal and corporate need a lot of thought and a lot of revision. they're both broken. but you're not going to do that in three weeks. the challenge i see is in three weeks you've got to have some convincing balance of the tax side, the revenue side, with the expenditure side. it's inherent. you can't change the expenditures in three weeks. you can indicate intentions, but you can't -- >> what do you think happens then? >> i think you get some understanding about the kind of framework for dealing with the expenditure s
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12